Street Art in Krakow

As if the street art in Warsaw weren’t enough, the stuff in Krakow blew my mind. Some of the art is genuine street art, done on the sly when no cops are around. The city commissioned other pieces so they were done legally, but that did not diminish the quality at all.

I love how the art is temporary and ever-changing as you can see in some of the photos. But, the art can still have an impact on its audience even as it is crumbling or fading away. I also love that sometimes the art is politically charged and socially aware of the commentary it’s creating. Other times, the art is fantastically whimsical and light-hearted in a child-like way.

Krakow’s street art really opened my eyes to new mediums of street art. The artists used different materials to create their designs in addition to the spray paint. I also noticed many techniques, including stenciling, stickers and the use of wheat paste to glue items to the wall.

Whether the piece is large or small, the creativity found within Krakow’s subculture is pretty sweet. Juxtaposed against the historical Old Town, the art seems to have an even deeper significance. It amazed me that a city would allow this type of thing to continue. I mean, I loved it, but most city officials probably think it’s crap (unless they paid for it of course). Despite being such an old place historically, Krakow is uniquely modern in other ways – progressive even. If you ever get a chance to visit, I would definitely recommend that you take the free walking tour and learn more about the city’s street art and history.

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2 Comments

Filed under Attraction, Poland

2 responses to “Street Art in Krakow

  1. hemajang

    I enjoyed the Krakow street art, thanks. I’ve seen the ones in Kakaako but I like Krakow better, somehow they seem to fit into the environment, very organic. I took note of the Scrabble/crossword puzzle street art and was impressed with the 12 letter word, haha. Also notice that many were in done with English words. Does that mean that many speak English there?

  2. I think people must study English from an early age as most people I spoke with were pretty fluent. I definitely had no trouble communicating with them, and of course, the tour guides spoke very well.

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