Studying Human History at the British Musuem

The British Museum completely blew my mind. It’s amazing and has become my favorite museum ever because it houses so many artifacts from so many ancient civilizations.

I spent a lot of time in the Ancient Egypt gallery taking in all the mummies and their sarcophagi, huge granite statues of Amenhotep III, statuesque busts of Ramesses II and, of course, the Rosetta Stone. The museum has the largest collection of ancient Egyptian antiquities outside of Cairo (and I won’t even begin to ponder the hows and whys of this). The etchings in the stone are still very visible. The mummies were wonderfully well-preserved. It feels as if you are truly stepping back in time.

Another vast collection I enjoyed was the Greek and Roman galleries. They included many artifacts from different societies, such as the Etruscan, Minoan, Mycenaean and more. When you enter a room, you never know what you’ll find. There were wall carvings depicting scenes of battle that lined entire hallways. There were floor-to-ceiling slabs of ancient buildings. Intricately carved marble statues were scattered throughout the wing. All were simply amazing!

I could’ve spent hours and hours (and I did) in The British Museum and still not covered everything. There are so many things I skimmed past or missed completely because there’s an exorbitant amount of things that call for your attention. It is definitely worth going back to again and again to discover new artifacts and revisit old favorites.

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2 Comments

Filed under Attraction, England

2 responses to “Studying Human History at the British Musuem

  1. A. Sanj

    When the sun hadn’t set on the British Empire, the Brits took the treasures from the Ancient World. They claim they are preserved today because of that, and they have a point. Cairo Museum can’t compare to the British Museum when it comes to temperature control, cleanliness, etc., altho both are my favorites. Did you miss the Elgin Marbles? – a good example of the preservation the Brits are talking about.

  2. I saw them but may have been museumed-out by the time I got there and didn’t take photos.

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